Volunteer Jobs at Trials
 *  Scribe  *

Scribe

Your job is to record the dog’s performance, any faults / points the dog gets as the judge calls them, and the time. You will be working with both the Timer and the Gatekeeper.


Details:

  1. Before the event you will be given the scribe sheets on a clipboard, 1 for each dog. You should also be given at least 1 pen. There is 1 scribe sheet per dog, with a large space in which to write faults and a place to record the time.  In some cases, you may also be given a sheet(s) with many dog’s names on it, with space for points/faults and time.
  2. Before the event go over the order with the Gatekeeper. The sheets should already be in same order as the gate list, but there could be changes to the running order, as dogs can get scratched or moved. Write DNR on sheets of dogs that have been scratched, and move any sheets to the new order if any dogs have moved.
  3. The judge will meet with you and the Timer before the event starts, to run over hand signals and give you any specific requirements. Please be on time. Signals are:
    1. one open hand - MARK a "5" on the scribe sheet
    2. two open hands - MARK a "10" on the scribe sheet
    3. one closed fist - MARK "R" on the scribe sheet
    4. two closed fists - MARK "20" on the scribe sheet
    5. hands open and parallel to the ground, waiving at waist height, back and forth - MARK an "E" on the scribe sheet
    6. hands and arms in the shape of a “T” – MARK a “T” on the scribe sheet. Notify the timer, who needs to blow the whistle at open time
  4. During the event you will sit at the side of the ring beside the Timer. As each dog runs you mark down any faults the judge signals on the scribe sheet for that dog. You must keep your eyes on the judge and not the dog, or you will not be able to do this job properly. It takes considerable concentration to do this.
  5. Though the scribe sheets start out in the correct running order, this can change during the event. Some dog may show up late or not at all, or there could be last minute changes that did not make it before the start of the event. The Gatekeeper should inform you of these as they happen. For dogs that don't show up, move the scribe sheet to the end, in case the dog shows up later. At the end of the event write DNR on the sheet. The scorekeeper needs all of the sheets, whether the dog ran or not.
  6. For dogs added at the last minute, there should be extra blank scribe sheets. Just add the dog’s name and number at the top. If there are no extra sheets, use the back of one and write somewhere on the front to let the scorekeeper know.
  7. It is important that the faults get put onto the CORRECT scribe sheet, so the dog at the start line must match to the scribe sheet. There are several ways this can be done. The Gatekeeper should call out the name of the dog before it runs. If this does not happen or you cannot hear, you can ask the handler the name of the dog. The scribe sheet can help. For example, if the dog is a Border Collie and the scribe sheet says Golden Retriever, you know something is wrong. Sometimes you will already know or get to know the dogs and handlers. Agree on a method with the Gatekeeper before the trial starts.
  8. Try to write the faults on the Scribe Sheet WITHOUT taking your eyes off the Judge (just glance at the Scribe Sheet VERY QUICKLY out of the corner of your eye).
  9. Make sure each number is separated enough so the it is distinct, that is two 5’s cannot be mistaken for 55. You can separate numbers by a comma (,) or a dash (-) or write them vertical.
  10. If there are no faults, leave the sheet blank.
  11. You must be able to see the judge at all times. If at any time the Judge moves BEHIND an obstacle so you see the signals, get up and move so that you can see. Inform the judge at the end of the run.
  12. If you have ANY concerns that you may have missed a signal, or that you may have written a signal down wrong, wait until the dog is finished (and continue to write down the faults), then IMMEDIATELY get up and signal the judge that you need to speak with him/her. Ask your question and write down the judge’s answer. You must do this right away, as the Judge CANNOT remember what fault he/she called 30 minutes earlier.
  13. Never correct an error yourself. Always ask the judge. Not only the judge must approve of any changes, but he/she must know of the mistake so he/she can prevent it from happening again.
  14. Write the time on the scribe sheet as given to you from the Timer. Write it exactly as given, number of seconds or minutes and seconds. Give the sheet to the scribe runner and get the next one ready as soon as possible.
  15. You could be given “duplicate” scribe sheets, i.e. sheets with a second yellow one attached. The top copy goes to the scorekeeper, the duplicate goes to the handler. Be sure this sheet is right on the clipboard and not on top of other sheets, as your writing can be recorded on the lower sheets. Do not worry about separating the sheets. This is the scribe runner’s job and you have enough to do.

Special Considerations for Gamblers Scribing

The difference here is that the judge will be calling points instead of signaling faults. Sometimes the judge will use a speaker system, sometimes not.

  1. Before the event test the speaker system with the judge so that it works and the volume is just enough so you can hear the judge.
  2. Write down the points as the judge calls them.
  3. It is especially important here that the points be distinct, as there can be double digits because of mini-gambles. Example, 14 should be distinguished from a 1 and 4. Easiest way is to circle all double digit points. You can also use any of the other methods given earlier.
  4. You must be alert at the end of the opening, in case the judge calls points as the whistle blows.
  5. The judge will tell you what signal means a successful gamble, usually a “thumbs up”. On the sheet where indicated, make a check mark or write “yes” for a successful gamble.
  6. If the gamble was not successful, write “no” so that the scorekeeper does not think you forgot a “yes”
  7. Again if you could not hear a call or think there was a mistake, go to the judge at the end of the run.
  8. If you cannot hear the judge, move to where you can hear him/her. Let the judge know if you cannot hear him/her.

Special Considerations for Snooker Scribing

As in Gamblers, the judge will be calling points instead of signaling faults. Sometimes the judge will use a speaker system, sometimes not.

  1. Before the event test the speaker system with the judge so that it works and the volume is just enough so you can hear the judge.
  2. Your scribe sheets may be in a special format for Snooker. An example are rows labeled 1 to 7, and you put a check mark in the correct row, that is a check in row 1 for 1 point, a check in row 5 for 5 points, and so on. Make sure you are familiar with the format before the start of the event.
  3. Write down the points as the judge calls them.
  4. You must be alert in case the judge calls points as the whistle blows.
  5. Again if you could not hear a call or think there was a mistake, go to the judge at the end of the run.
  6. If you cannot hear the judge, move to where you can hear him/her. Let the judge know if you cannot hear him/her.